Monthly Archives: October 2018

25 years ago:THE Western District will lead a push to celebrate Australia Day on January 1, the anniversary of the day Australia became a federation in 1901. The issue is likely to be debated as the Australian Labor Party puts in motion a campaign to pronounce Australia an independent republic on January 26, 2001.
Nanjing Night Net

A PROPOSAL to build three new netball courts at Warrnambool football ovals is being held up pending a review by a rival netball association. The Warrnambool and District Football League Netball Association wants to build courts at the Mack Oval, Walter Oval and Merrivale Reserve but the city council is waiting on a reply from the Warrnambool City Netball Association, whose Caramut Road courts are used each Saturday for an inter-church competition and available for District League games.

50 years ago:THIS year’s Warrnambool Grand Annual Steeple will be the richest in the history of the event. It will carry $4500 prize money –the highest the club has ever allotted to any one race.

THE top teams in the Hampden League, and their supporters, were “killing football” by their selfish attitude, Koroit Football Club treasurer Mr E. Franklin said. The stronger clubs in the league would do nothing to help the weaker clubs, he said. “There is nothing I would like to see more than you beating some of these teams,” he told the club’s annual meeting.

100 years ago:THERE was satisfactory attendance at a public meeting convened by the Mayor Cr Webb for the purpose of organising the recruiting campaign for this portion of Corangamite. The Mayor said it was the duty of citizens to rally round the banner of the Empire at the present war crisis and do everything possible to assist in obtaining more recruits.

A NEW light has been placed at the end of the Warrnambool breakwater. It flashes every four seconds, giving a green light out to sea and a red light when in line with and behind the breakwater. Sometimes it is dangerous at the end of the breakwater and men attending to the old light occasionally incurred considerable risks of being caught by a heavy sea.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net. Continue reading

  • Posted on 20. October 2018
  • Written by admin
  • Categories: 南京夜网
Comments Off on Historicals: Date change in spotlight

Cr Marianne Saliba: Shellharbour City Council’s Back to Business Week event will be held on Thursday, March 2, as part of the council’s economic development push.
Nanjing Night Net

After a beautiful summer holiday season here on the coast, many in the community are recharged and ready to embrace the opportunities of the year ahead.

The first Shellharbour City Business Network meeting for the year will focus on improving productivity with guest speaker, Paul Breen at 5.30pm-7.30pm, on Wednesday, February 15.

Mr Breen has a wealth of information about vocational training and is passionate about supporting young people in the work environment. As always, the monthly meeting is free and this one will be particularly attractive to any business person that wishes to better engage with young people, particularly to realise the full potential of their employees.

Anyone interested can contact council on 4221 6030 to register.

Experts will be on hand to provide business people with the support needed to optimise business growth at the Shellharbour City Council Back to Business Week event on Thursday, March 2.

Brief presentations from speakers from a range of government business support organisations will be provided. The event will also include a free, three-hour workshop on how to develop and implement an effective growth strategy for your business. This will provide a great platform for growing business during the next 12 months. For more information contact councilon 4221 6030.

Applications are now open for the next free business development program – Economic Gardening Illawarra that starts on March 21.

The structured business development program is free to businesses located in the Shellharbour, Kiama and Wollongong Local Government Areas.

Economic Gardening IllawarraThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net. Continue reading

Comments Off on Focusing on business

WAX ON, WAX OFF: Orchardist Peter Darley will save $60,000 thanks to the supermarkets allowing unwaxed fruit onto their shelves. Photo: JUDE KEOGH APPLE growers will save millions of dollars after two major supermarkets relented on their demand that the fruit be waxed to make it look more shiny.
Nanjing Night Net

Coles supermarkets moved to selling wax-free apples earlier this month andWoolworths will do the same from February.

Both chains said the move was due to demand for more natural-looking fruit.

Orange apple grower Peter Darley hailed it as a big win justweeks before this year’s harvest.

Mr Darley said spraying apples with wax was expensive due to the high cost of the LPG needed to heat the substance.

He said the LPGcost $1.50 per case of apples.

That equatedto a $60,000 saving for his 40,000 cases of apples and more than $3 million for the 2-2.5 million cases of apples produced in Orange every year.

“A major issue in our favour is that the supermarkets have said they will accept apples that are un-waxed. People are looking to buy the natural product,” Mr Darley said.

“This is a big saving. LPG gas is not cheap, it is like petrol, it is expensive.”

Mr Darley said the spraying was done in packing sheds.

He said shoppers wanted more natural products but it did not mean they would miss out on seeing shiny fruit in their store.

“They will still be washed and polished, just not waxed,” he said.

Growers will also save on labour costs and on having to clean waxing machines.

Coles spokeswoman Jasmine Zwiebel said the move would not effect the price of apples.

“It’s a cost reduction for the growers,” she said.“Fruit pricing is seasonal, prices will fluctuate.”

And she said it would not change the quality or taste.

“The wax applied was safe, edible food wax. Some people will say they [un-waxed] are more fragrant or flavourful but we don’t have any evidence of that,” she said.

Woolworths head of produce Scott Davidson said they had listened to customer demand.

“It has been undertaken in full consultation with both the industry body, Apple and Pear Australia Limited(APAL) and all Woolworths apple suppliers,” Mr Davidson said.

An APAL video explaining apple waxHe said the main reason for waxing was presentation.

“While an un-waxed apple make look duller, it will still taste just as good and will contain all the nutrients that an added wax apple has.”

Apple and Pear Australia Ltd (APAL) chief executive officer, Philip Turnbull, said some growers see value in waxing their apples, while some are happy to supply ‘no added wax’ apples.

“We represent all growers and this diversity of opinion,” Mr Turnbull said.

“However, if the major retailers’ move to apples with no added wax means people eat more apples, then, overall, it could be good for the industry.”

According to APAL, apples with no added wax have always been available in many retail outlets and farmers markets.

Organic apples don’t have added wax by definition and many pre-packed apples – apples sold in bags – also don’t have added wax.

“As Woolworths and Coles change to selling more apples with no added wax it may mean changes for growers who may have invested in waxing equipment and the wax itself. It may also complicate their packing lines if they need to wax some apples and not others,” Mr Turnbull said.

“However, we are happy when retailers look at finding new ways to excite consumers about apples and encourage apple consumption.

“We hope Woolworths’ and Coles’ decision to stock apples with no added wax helps to highlight that apples are a delicious and nutritious natural snack.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net. Continue reading

Comments Off on Apple growers to save from “wax off” policy

Country Music Festival in full swing | Photos Annual trip to Tamworth for Danielle Thompson, Parkdale; Simone Chalmers, Patterson Lakes; Narelle Tsiros, Parkdale; Narelle Tsiros, Parkdale; Nix Fraser, Sandringham; Riles Reilly, Marseille France, and Eddie Jenkins, Sandringham. Photos: Rachael Webb
Nanjing Night Net

‘Buck yeah’ contingent from NZ: Shaun Thompson, Thomas Ngatai, Michelle Ngatai, Vai Kasieli, Sharlene Thompson, Glen Reedy and Robert Gaitau, at The Longyard Hotel.

Tyson Green, Singleton; Aleisha Taggart, Broke; Tim Green, Singleton; Jamie Green, Singleton, and Brenda Chong, Singleton.

Jenny Earl and her daughter, Jazmin, from Weston via Currey Currey.

Daniel Porter, Sarah Payne and their daughter Emily Porter, 14 months, Tamworth.

Cath and Leon Mackiewicz, Bellangry, with (centre) Caths mum, Margot Hobson, Tamworth.

Mates, Damien Pringle and Jasmine Sutnikov, Scone, with Holly Harris and Mathew Harris, Gunnedah, catching up at The Longyard Hotel.

Mates Catherine and Warren Carney, Wauchope, Glenn and Danielle Simpson, Kirrawee, enjoying the festivities at The Longyard Hotel

Charlie Saliba, Central Coast, with his ‘Millenium Country’ performing on Peel St. Charlie has been travelling to Tamworth for 37 years.

Vicki Sheehan, Tamworth; Kellie Sheehan, Tamworth; Dani Robson, Tamworth; Luke Robinson, Tamworth, and (at back) Adrienne Baker, Wamberal, at The Longyard Hotel.

Nola Crichton (been coming to TCMF since 1979) and Susie Ortlipp, both from Albury.

Ian and Jackie Melder catching up with Jackie and Pete Sparks, from Tamworth, at The Longyard Hotel.

Julie Lawlor, Central Coast; Kaybe McMullen, Central Coast; Tony Northcott, SA; Adrienne and Glenn Baker, Central Coast, all at The Longyard Hotel.

Paul Gers, Muswellbrook, on the mechanical bull.

Ryan Morris performing at The Longyard Hotel.

Renie Watson, Mollymook; Vicki Williams, Quakers Hill; Kerrie Samuels, Central Coast, and Shirley Cameron, Blacktown.

Joel Purcell and Corinne Death, both from Sydney.

Not letting the rain dampen their spirits is Sophie Timbs, 8, “Uki”, Walcha; Jess Bridger, 18, Brisbane, and Olivia Callanan, 9, Sydney.

Tamworth girls, Jessica Urquhart and Lakayla Dickson at The Longyard Hotel.

Kane Allan, Taree, and Vikki Squire, Sydney, catching up beside their mate Justin’s ute at The Longyard Hotel.

Shelly Hannaford, Gympie, and Tess Preston, Umina Beach, at The Longyard Hotel.

Queen of Country Music Quest entrants, Erin Whitten, “Bon Accord”, Tamworth, and Sarah Weatherley, “Balyarta”, Quirindi.

Draper kids, Ruby, 2 and Wyatt, 4, from Tamworth, having fun in the rain on Peel Street.

Festival goers dancing to Ryan Morris at The Longyard Hotel.

Angela and Peter Dunn, Richmond, Tasmania.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net. Continue reading

Comments Off on Country Music Festival in full swingPhotos

NO SHOW: Brett Gleeson, the president of the Newcastle Show Association, says the show needs funding assistance. PICTURE: Jonathan CarrollEDITORIAL: Show deserves supportTHE Newcastle Show is cash-strapped and faces being permanently wound up unless the state government agrees to provide emergency funding, organisers say.
Nanjing Night Net

While this year’s show is safe, association president Brett Gleeson has warned that three consecutive years of bad weather, the loss of the show public holiday, and the redirection of funding from the showgrounds to the state government’s coffers has led to a “critical” situation that could mean 2017 is the last time the show is ever held.

“I don’t want to be alarmist but it is critical [and] without support from the government and the business community the show won’t exist after this year,” he said.

“We’ve seen our funding depleted year after year and now we’re at a point where there is very little left in the kitty.”

At the heart of the matter is a decision by the former state Labor government in 2008 to abolish the former Newcastle Showground and Exhibition Centre Trust in favour of a more central manager –now Venues NSW.

It saw the trust lose control of the showgroundsand the associated rent and parking income along with it.

The decision crippled the association –in 2006 the trust listed assets in excess of $3 million. Now, Mr Gleeson says the show association has $10,000 left in the bank.

“Really I see what we’re asking for as compensation, Mr Gleeson said. “The show association is going broke becausewe can’t get access to any income while Venues NSW is sitting on money that belongs to the Hunter.”

The situation has been made worse by the loss of the annual show public holiday. After years of debate about the holiday –which the Hunter Business Chamber complained cost local businesses $35 million –Mr Gleeson relented in 2015 and agreed not to apply for the holiday.

“We gave up the public holiday and had hoped that with the benefit they received we would have had support from the business community,” he said.

But after losing about $130,000 from not having the public holiday, Mr Gleeson said the show only got about $18,000 in additional sponsors. He’s been meeting with business representatives in the lead up to this year’s show to try and drum up support.

Hunter Business Chamber chief executive Bob Hawes said the chamber “continues to promote partnerships and engagement between the business community and the Newcastle Show”.

However he said the chamber would not support the reintroduction of a show holiday.

“The Chamber supports the show as an important event but not at the expense of businesses in this region,” he said.

Mr Gleeson has also made representations to the government’s parliamentary secretary Scot MacDonald, who has been speaking to members of the government.

Continue reading

Comments Off on Newcastle Show faced with uncertain future